"

What Is CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME?

About the width of your thumb, the carpal tunnel is a narrow channel on the palm side of your wrist. The tunnel protects the median nerve and the tendons that bend your fingers. Pressure on the nerve can cause pain and weakness in your wrist and hand and numbness or tingling in some of your fingers. This pressure is caused by crowding or irritation of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel and can lead to CTS. Read more.

 

Can this Injury or Condition be Prevented?

There are no proven strategies for preventing CTS, but there are ways to minimize stress to your hands and wrists. Since there are contributing factors to developing CTS, one single solution may not be effective. The following strategies are effective ways to minimize stress to your hands and wrists: Reduce force. Most people use more force than needed when performing work with their hands. Relax your grip to avoid muscle fatigue and strain. For prolonged handwriting, use a larger-handle pen or soft gel grip. Take frequent breaks. When doing repeated activities, give your hands a break by performing stretching exercises once in a while. If possible, alternate your hands when completing some tasks. Neutral wrist position. Avoid bending your wrists by keeping them in a straight or “neutral” position. This means your wrist should not be bent up (extended) or down (flexed). Work area adjustment. Read more

 

How Can a Physical Therapist Help?

If your evaluation confirms early-stage CTS, conservative care will be recommended as a first step. Physical therapy treatment can be effective in reducing your symptoms and getting you back to performing normal activities. During your first visit with the physical therapist, be prepared to describe your symptoms in as much detail as possible, and say what makes your symptoms worse. Depending upon the causes of your CTS, your therapy program may include: Education regarding: changing wrist positions (ie, avoiding prolonged bent wrist positions) proper neck and upper back posture (ie, avoiding forward head or slouching) safe use of sharp utensils, tools, or other implements, if sensory changes are identified "stretch breaks" during your work or daily routine Exercises to increase the strength of the muscles in your hand, fingers, and forearm—and in some cases, the trunk and postural back muscles Stretching exercises to improve the flexibility of the wrist, hand, and fingers Use of heat/cold treatments to relieve pain" Read more.

Source: moveforwardpt.com

 

ARTHRITIS

BACK PAIN

BODY MECHANICS

CARPAL TUNNEL

DIABETIC NEUROPATHY

FALL PREVENTION

HEART HEALTH

KNEE REPLACEMENT

OSTEOPOROSIS

PARKINSONS

ROTATOR CUFF

STROKE